Feline Leukemia Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

What are Feline Leukemia Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus?

Feline Leukemia Virus or FeLV can cause a comprised immune system in a cat. According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP), the prevalence of FeLV occurring in pet cats is, on average, 2.3%. FeLV can be transmitted from infected cats when the transfer of saliva or nasal secretions is involved. Cats can fight off the infection and become totally immune, they can become a healthy carrier who never gets sick but can infect other cats, or they may develop a compromised immune system. Symptomatic cats live an average of three years after diagnosis.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, or FIV, also causes a compromised immune system in a cat. According to the AAFP, the prevalence of FIV occurring in pet cats is, on average, 2.5%. FIV is transmitted from infected cats through deep bite wounds. While rare, kittens can be born with FIV transmitted from their mothers in utero. Cats infected with FIV are often asymptomatic for years and can live long healthy lives.

For more information on FIV or FeLV, please see the below links:

Facts About Feline Leukemia Virus

Feline Leukemia Virus Disease Complex

Feline Leukemia Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Testing

Feline leukemia misconceptions

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus